PASSIMer of the month (Hyo Yoon)

Posted in: General on 15 October, 2018 by hyoka24

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I teach intellectual property and related issues at the Kent Law School. As part of the PASSIM project, I will find out about scientists’ understanding and use of patents as a documentation and information source beyond the legal role of patents as property rights. Understanding the way in which a complex and coded legal writing such as a patent is read, used and employed beyond its intended function, I hope, will reveal how law represents and shapes other systems of knowledge, as well as itself being a distinctive one. The question of media and technique is central in this project, as is a reflection of the reading practices and interpretation of a specific genre.

Academically I have a multi-disciplinary training and background in law, politics, history of science and anthropological theory. This is an unintended result caused by the nature of the questions or problems that I have been interested in: I started out analysing the intersection of human genetics and human rights during my Master’s, then my doctoral dissertation explored the meaning of human person in human gene patents, which then led me to examine how scientific knowledge is represented and ordered in legal classifications, which was the subject my postdoc research. Looking back, one common thread throughout my work has been finding out about the concrete details of knowledge creation and wanderings, as well as abstraction and materiality.

Currently my home discipline is law, but throughout my academic training, I read and learned other disciplinary ‘canons’ and current debates in anthropology, philosophy, political and social theory, history of science, and science and technology studies. With hindsight I am grateful that I was expected to read whole books and/or difficult original primary texts during my school and university years. Realising as a teenager that it takes me a week to read and understand two pages of Kant’s Critique of Practical Reason helped me perhaps to work through an introduction into molecular biology textbook when I was doing a PhD. It definitely raised the frustration threshold! Pre-uni I was trained in music, which also involved substantial time and personal commitments, but also made me realise the benefits and drawbacks of an intense formation.

Different questions and issues demand different perspectives and approaches. The PASSIM project brings to the fore that a patent is/can function as public documentation. This in turn raises questions about the nature of publicness, documentation, information – and ultimately, proprietary boundaries. Patent is the ultimate boundary object in so many ways, and it is well approached for its full meaning and implication from multi- or trans-disciplinary perspectives. I am extremely fortunate and excited to be part of PASSIM both from the point of view of my research interests and its perfect fit, as well as having such a lovely group of colleagues to work with.


 

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Updated call for papers for first PASSIM workshop

Posted in: Call for papers PASSIM workshop(s) on 14 October, 2018 by Eva Hemmungs Wirtén

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Happy to announce that Shobita Parthasarathy will be joing us for our first PASSIM workshop in September 2019!


 

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PASSIMer of the month (Jose)

Posted in: Researcher presentations on 11 June, 2018 by josbe35

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Currently, I teach Intellectual property law in the same city where Chaucer based his famous medieval tales. I would like to think that if there is a defining feature of my work is eclecticism. My doctoral dissertation was on the history of copyright in Latin America in the late nineteenth century (PhD 2009). I was supervised and influenced by Fiona Macmillan and the wonderful postgraduate community at Birkbeck College, London. Since then, I have been- and I am still- interested in many (too many!) things: music, evidence, registration, scrabble, toys, bureaucracy, etc. Because of that variety of interests, I tend to avoid or to push the clear textbook boundaries within the discipline. Ironically, my last publication is however an edited collection of the disciplinary type that, nevertheless, tried to raise historical questions about the subject: Landmark Cases in Intellectual Property (Hart, 2017). In a sense, I guess, what really keeps me researching on this area of law is somehow an uncanny curiosity around questions surrounding (the history of) copying, representation, publicness, imitation, technology and bureaucratic routines. Perhaps the phrase that captured many of these anxieties and that I would have loved to have written myself is the following (….and I am copying here!): “the history of intellectual property can be seen as one of the law attempting to contain and restrict the intangible – to capture the phantom” (Sherman and Bently, The Making of Intellectual Property, CUP, 1999, 59).

What does it mean for PASSIM? For someone like me who prefers the blurring over the drawing of distinctions, PASSIM offers a great opportunity to discuss questions of copyright/patents in a group of excellent researchers and scholars. My individual project is not just an obvious attempt to discuss the regime overlap but also an attempt to reflect on the historical changes affecting the discipline in the twentieth century.


 

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PASSIMer of the month (Eva)

Posted in: Researcher presentations on 6 May, 2018 by Eva Hemmungs Wirtén

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As PI of PASSIM, I’m taking the liberty of opening this new category in the PASSIM blog: a brief presentation of each team member (including then, myself). Currently, I’m Professor of Mediated Culture at Linköping University, Sweden – but I started out in Comparative Literature, defending Global Infatuation—my thesis on Harlequin Enterprises—in 1998. Harlequin was a fascinating topic, and I guess some of the interest I later came to take in intellectual property can be traced back to the branding strategies of the Canadian publisher. But it wasn’t until I came across a speech made by Victor Hugo in 1878 on the need for some sort of international copyright treaty (it materialized as the Berne Convention in 1886) that intellectual property became “my” research field. For almost twenty years now, I’ve been hooked. Some of the focus has shifted, of course. I’ve become less interested in copyright and more interested in patents, research and science – topics I pursued in my latest book Making Marie Curie (Chicago, 2015) and that is now at the center of the PASSIM-project. I’ve never identified myself with a particular discipline, probably because while I have a PhD in Comp Lit, then spent a few years in Library- and Information Science, and now have a professorship in mediated culture (something which basically doesn’t exist as a discipline)…. intellectual property has been the only constant in all of these settings. I’m really looking forward to working with the PASSIM-team and to see what will develop around the project that we have no clue about right now. I remember writing in the ERC-application that “Research projects are not static and predictable units, because if they were they would not be research projects at all.” I’d like to think that I’m an advocate of the peaceful coexistence of structure and serendipity!

What else? There’s a bit more on my website http://www.evahemmungswirten.se but I’m really interested in the political economy of champagne and would love to get a chance to write about champagne as intellectual property. A super-topic, in my mind! Until that day, however, I keep collecting so-called grower champagnes….not a bad way to start future research!

 


 

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PASSIM kicks off!

Posted in: General on 30 January, 2018 by Eva Hemmungs Wirtén

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On January 17-18, 2018, I was delighted to welcome the PASSIM team for our kick-off meeting in Norrköping, Sweden. Snow was in the air, but fortunately both flights and trains ran (more or less) according to schedule. A kick-off is a thing to itself: a very important time in the life of a project, an opportunity to discuss, plan ahead and form a group of individuals into a team.

One of the truly fantastic things about the ERC grants is the fact that they run for five years. Five years! It seems almost impossible to be able to work, to read, to discuss, and to write on the topic of your project for such an extended period. An eternity, almost. But time is a funny thing in research. We measure it constantly in our line of work. Nonetheless, the idea of unbounded time is neither realistic, nor desirable.

In fact, one could argue that a five-year project comes alive when you start to talk about and plan around its built-in constraints – the fact that you’ve promised to do certain activities and that these activities, when you start thinking about when you’re supposed to do them, suddenly make unbounded time seem very bounded. And a good thing, too, I suspect.

It’s always been an ambition of mine that I, together with any team members I was working with, would find a way to document the process of working as a team in an interdisciplinary project. I still haven’t quite figured out exactly how to do this, but I remain convinced that the documentation of the way in which we work, talk, disagree and form some sort of community during an extended period is worth studying as a form of self-reflexive exercise in its own right. Maybe this blog is one way of doing precisely that.

Welcome to PASSIM!

 

Eva Hemmungs Wirtén and Johanna Dahlin in meeting room.

Eva Hemmungs Wirtén and Johanna Dahlin.

Mattis Karlsson and Gustav Källstrand talking together in meeting room.

Mattis Karlsson and Gustav Källstrand.

From left to right: José Bellido, Johanna Dahlin, Martin Fredriksson and Björn Hammarfelt

Thordis Arrhenius, Hyo Yoon Kang, Isabelle Strömstedt and Mattis Karlsson in meeting room.

Thordis Arrhenius, Hyo Yoon Kang, Isabelle Strömstedt and Mattis Karlsson.

Meeting room during seminar

PASSIM launch seminar held in Tvärsnittet, Kopparhammaren at Campus Norrköping, Linköping University.


 

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Passim

Patents as Scientific Information, 1895-2020, (PASSIM) is a five-year project funded by the European Research Council (ERC) under the Horizon 2020 research and innovation program. The grant is awarded to Professor Eva Hemmungs Wirtén at Linköping University.

In this blog, updates on activities in the project will be published. For full information about the project, visit www.passim.se

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