pre-seminar to ISHTIP 2019

Posted in: Seminars on 16 May, 2019 by Eva Hemmungs Wirtén

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Both PASSIM PI Eva Hemmungs Wirtén and Doctoral candidate Isabelle Strömstedt will be presenting papers at the forthcoming ISHTIP workshop in Australia, between July 4-6, 2019. Hosted this year by Isabella Alexander at University of Technology, Sydney, ISHTIP has become an important interdisciplinary venue for scholars whose work engages with intellectual property, both historically and in the present. This year’s theme, “IP and the visual,” promises to be a very stimulating one. On May 22, 2019, PASSIM organizes a “pre-ISHTIP” seminar where our two ISHTIP participants will discuss their papers and talk about their current research. Eva Hemmungs Wirtén’s paper is entitled “Evidence, Envelopped: Something on Proof, Priority and Patents (but not necessarily in that order)” och Isabelle Strömstedt’s “Celebrating Patents: the Swedish Patent Office’s Jubilee Exhibition of 1941.” The seminar will take place at Tema Q, Tvärsnittet, Norrköping, between 13.15-15.00. What do envelopes and exhibitions have to do with patents? That’s what we’ll talk about at the seminar.

Eva ISHTIP abstract

Isabelle ISHTIP abstract


 

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Post-May 7th seminar/webinar thoughts

Posted in: Seminars on 16 May, 2019 by Eva Hemmungs Wirtén

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Matts Lindström

 

Last week, on May 7th 2019, we had our first PASSIM seminar. This was a first for us, at least in the sense of doing a seminar and webinar at the same time. José Bellido and Matts Lindström’s discussion on microfilm was an excellent illustration of how rich the intersection between technologies of law and technologies of media can be, an intersection that PASSIM explores in different ways and different historical periods. Matts opened the seminar with a sweeping and informative overview of the microfilm’s relationship to the fragility of paper and to the industrialization of information, aspects that are crucial in trying to understand the past but also the present of a media technology that appears almost extinct. José’s more PASSIM-oriented talk showed how microfilm intervenes in a particular practice and institution – the patent office and in the work of patent examiners. Fascinating stuff! You can enjoy the dialogue between our two presenters and also the questions and discussion that followed on our website: http://www.passim.se

 

Getting ready to broadcast. In socks.

José Bellido

 

 

 

 


 

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PASSIMer of the month (Martin)

Posted in: Researcher presentations on 30 April, 2019 by Martin Fredriksson

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Academically speaking, I consider myself an interdisciplinary street breed with master’s degrees in comparative literature and art history, a PhD from the Department for Culture and Society at Linköping University, and a subsequent research trajectory that spans from legal history to studies of social movements. I have, however, maintained a consistent focus on IPR. I wrote my dissertation on the cultural history of Swedish copyright law, where I traced the concepts of authorship, creativity and the public interest through a series of copyrights act from 1810 to 1960. Since then, the balance between property rights and public interests have been an underlying theme in my research. I have worked extensively with issues of copyright and media piracy: for three years I travelled the world, interviewing Pirate Party members from North America, Europe and Australia in order to understand the ideology of piracy. It struck me that the conflicts around piracy largely concern whether cultural expressions are to be defined as common resources or private property. In a subsequent project, entitled ‘Commons and Commodities’ (funded by the EU Marie Skldowska Curie Actions under Grant E0633901), I pursued that line of thought and explored conflicts around other types of resources that are in the grey zone between private property and commons. This included controversial mining projects and other forms of extraction of natural resources, but also the appropriation of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge through so called biopiracy.

Questions of indigenous rights and biopiracy have brought patents into the focus of my research and I am now thrilled to delve deeper into the world of patent law within the Passim project. Next stop on my geographic and academic route is India as my contribution to the Passim project will be an analysis of India’s National Intellectual Property Rights Policy from 2016, with special focus on its relation to India’s postcolonial patent history. Read more about this study here.


 

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New Directions for India’s Patent Strategies?

Posted in: General on 4 April, 2019 by Martin Fredriksson

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In 2016 India adopted a National Intellectual Property Rights Policy dedicated to reinforcing ‘the strengths of IPRs to acquire both economic and social benefits’. At a first glance this new IPR policy looks like the last leg on a political and ideological journey that has taken India from independence in 1947 to a global economic power of the 21st century. My work within the Passim project will explore where this last leg leads, and what it says about the production and appropriation of knowledge in a postcolonial world.

In the 20th century India took a unique position in relation to global IPR policies. Beginning with the revision of India’s colonial IPR laws in the 1950s, India came to challenge a global patent agenda that was seen to serve the interests of industrialized economies at the expense of developing nations. In the following decades India carved out a space of agency within the increasingly globalized IPR regime. By adopting national patent laws that enabled local production of generic drugs, India not only served its domestic social need, but also became a supplier of generic drugs for other developing countries as well as vocal defender of global rights to medicine. Consequently, India was consistently targeted as a rouge state by American and European trade representatives and IP-organizations.

With the liberalization of the Indian economy and the increased globalization of the intellectual property rights in the 1990s, India took up a new route. After joining the WTO in 1995 India revised its IP laws to be TRIPS-compliant – a fact they consistently emphasize in the 2016 IPR-policy. In that regard, the new IPR policy seems to confirm that India has finally submitted to the global IPR-agenda. On the other hand, the 2016 IPR policy also highlights India’s role as a creator of IP, and it particularly emphasizes its rich body of traditional knowledge as a national resource of economic, cultural and social value that need to be protected against foreign exploitation. So while India’s new policymakers embrace the rhetoric of IP evangelism, they still emphasize national sovereignty and social needs.

This study departs from the assumption that India remains a proactive actor with its own agenda in the global IPR landscape, and it sets out to explore what that agenda is and how it is to be implemented. It thus remains to be seen whether India is looking to build a postcolonial or a post-postcolonial patent regime and what that means for the control and circulation of different forms of knowledge as patents.


 

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“How Patents Became Documents, or Dreaming of Technoscientific Order, 1895-1937”

Posted in: Project articles on 12 March, 2019 by Eva Hemmungs Wirtén

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Eva Hemmungs Wirtén’s first article in the PASSIM-project: “How Patents Became Documents, or Dreaming of Technoscientific Order, 1895-1937” is now published in Journal of Documentation (2019) Vol 75 Issue 3, pp 577-592,. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1108/JD-11-2018-0193

In it, and based on Paul Otlet’s 1937 image of the mountain range of documents to the left (where patents are one among seven types of informational inclines), she argues:

“Patents are indistinguishable from the
structures of the information age; indeed, they have helped build these structures in the first
place, producing their own administrative and expertise communities, straddling the
national and the international, becoming dependent on systems of classification, sorting and
ordering, as indeed, acting every bit as the social texts that they are.
Simply put, more research is warranted on the embeddedness – historical as well as
contemporary – of patents in informational systems. Such embeddedness has been
constitutive of the patent system for more than a century but still remains
under-researched.”

 

 

 

Laboratorium Mundaneum: Powerhouse of Documentation. [December 28, 1937] (Mons, Mundaneum EUM 8694©)


 

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Passim

Patents as Scientific Information, 1895-2020, (PASSIM) is a five-year project funded by the European Research Council (ERC) under the Horizon 2020 research and innovation program. The grant is awarded to Professor Eva Hemmungs Wirtén at Linköping University.

In this blog, updates on activities in the project will be published. For full information about the project, visit www.passim.se

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