PASSIMer of the month (Marc)

Marc Stuhldreier is a new addition to the PASSIM team, and as of this fall Postdoctoral Fellow in Culture and Society at Linköping University, he is also our PASSIMer of the month.

I come an academic background in business law and human rights, my research interest lies in analysing international patent rights, addressing their flaws and supporting the creation of a patent system that is fair and just for all stakeholders. To this end, I seek to account for the different needs of countries and populations at different stages of development. Additionally, my planned research aims for a re-balancing of the incentivisation system which should be based on needs rather than being cantered around purely monetary considerations. I am further interested in scientific and technological advancements and their implications on and interrelation with the field of IP and patent rights as well as issues concerning data protection and privacy.

Currently, I am a Postdoctoral Fellow in Culture and Society at Linköping University, and I joined the PASSIM project as its latest member. Prior to this, I conducted PhD studies at Northumbria University Newcastle, where I analysed pharmaceutical patent rights and their detrimental impacts on the accessibility of medicines and the human right to health. A key theme of my thesis was the identification of responsibilities of private corporations towards the realisation of human rights. A further interest I developed throughout my studies lies in the subject of data privacy in the context of technological advancements. After finishing my PhD, I decided to gather professional experiences as a data protection officer before joining Linköping University and PASSIM to continue my research in the field of patents and technology as a Postdoc.

My PASSIM research project now focusses on the efficacy of the research incentives provided by patent rights. The planned activity is divided into two sub-categories and research questions. The first question addresses the efficacy of patents for incentivising research into highly required innovations, such as new medicines, where the resulting products do not necessarily offer a high profitability (e.g. orphan drugs or neglected diseases). The second part of my planned research focusses on leaks of scientific information and research data, and its impacts on the novelty requirement for patenting innovations. This part of the analysis shall identify whether and when the theft and unlawful disclosure of scientific information can jeopardise the patentability of new inventions.

I am quite excited to be a part of the wonderful PASSIM team, and I am looking forward to adding my two cents to this ECR funded project.

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