New PASSIM article! “Linking science to technology: the patent paper citation and the rise of patentometrics in the 1980s”

Earlier this week Björn Hammarfelt’s first paper in the PASSIM-project was published in Journal of Documention. The article titled “Linking science to technology: the patent paper citation and the rise of patentometrics in the 1980s” can be described as a conceptual history of the patent paper citation.The study analyses how a further interest for patents as scientific documents from several domains, including research policy, bibliometrics and the sociology of science was evident during the 1980s. In many ways the patent was treated as just another document containing scientific information, and the patent citation was viewed as readily available indicator for answering key questions in contemporarydeliberations on the role of scientific research in relation to technological development. In representing these links, patents, and patent citations, became a common point of reference which allowed for measurement and comparison of entities that otherwise appear as separate and non-calculable. The paper concludes by arguing for a broader more reflexive understanding of references in patents, including their social, legal and rhetorical function.

The full text can be accessed here: https://www.emerald.com/insight/content/doi/10.1108/JD-12-2020-0218/full/html

 

“How Patents Became Documents, or Dreaming of Technoscientific Order, 1895-1937”

Eva Hemmungs Wirtén’s first article in the PASSIM-project: “How Patents Became Documents, or Dreaming of Technoscientific Order, 1895-1937” is now published in Journal of Documentation (2019) Vol 75 Issue 3, pp 577-592,. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1108/JD-11-2018-0193

In it, and based on Paul Otlet’s 1937 image of the mountain range of documents to the left (where patents are one among seven types of informational inclines), she argues:

“Patents are indistinguishable from the
structures of the information age; indeed, they have helped build these structures in the first
place, producing their own administrative and expertise communities, straddling the
national and the international, becoming dependent on systems of classification, sorting and
ordering, as indeed, acting every bit as the social texts that they are.
Simply put, more research is warranted on the embeddedness – historical as well as
contemporary – of patents in informational systems. Such embeddedness has been
constitutive of the patent system for more than a century but still remains
under-researched.”

 

 

 

Laboratorium Mundaneum: Powerhouse of Documentation. [December 28, 1937] (Mons, Mundaneum EUM 8694©)